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Romulus Gaita fled his home in his native Yugoslavia at the age of thirteen, and came to Australia with his Romulus, My Father. by Raimond Gaita. ebook. association of nsw • metaphor issue 3, romulus my father universe of the native romulus my father raimond gaita - tldr - [pdf]free romulus my father raimond gaita download book romulus my father raimond bvifacts.info Read "Romulus, My Father Text Classics" by Raimond Gaita with Rakuten Kobo. Romulus Gaita fled Yugoslavia aged thirteen, and came to Australia with his.


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Raimond Gaita was born in Germany in His books have been published in many translations. They include: Good and Evil: It is a tragic, uplifting book whose eponymous hero emerges as one of the more magnetic creations in recent Australian writing.

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Romulus, My Father by Raimond Gaita

Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Romulus, My Father by Raimond Gaita. Romulus Gaita fled his home in his native Yugoslavia at the age of thirteen, and came to Australia with his young wife Christina and their infant son Raimond soon after the end of World War II.

Written simply and movingly, Romulus, My Father is about how a compassionate and honest man taught his son the meaning of living a decent life. It is about passion, betrayal and madness, about friendship and the joy and dignity of work, about character and fate, affliction and spirituality. Get A Copy. Published July 8th by Headline first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews.

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Showing Rating details. Sort order. Jul 11, Manny rated it it was amazing Recommended to Manny by: This is a book about a good person, and when you read it you see how hard it is to create such a book and do it well. Most books which are supposed to be about good people are rather nauseating. You see at once that the author is trying to manipulate you into conforming to his or her idea of what goodness is supposed to be, and after a short while you resent it.

There are several other things that usually make me dislike these books. One of them is that I tend to have severe doubts about whether This is a book about a good person, and when you read it you see how hard it is to create such a book and do it well. One of them is that I tend to have severe doubts about whether the person in question really is very good. Another is that the author often feels they need to show that goodness reaps a reward; for example riches, success and popularity, or worse the joys of some dubiously plausible afterlife.

Raimond Gaita has not fallen into any of these traps. He describes his father in simple, moving words, and paints a convincing picture of someone who is genuinely good.

Not because he feels he will be rewarded for it, a point which is made extremely clear, and not because he has been indoctrinated by some specious religion, although Romulus in his quiet, understated way is fairly religious.

He is good for the reasons that Plato explains at length in Gorgias and the Republic: Romulus has been lucky enough to understand this from an early age.

He does not reflect on whether he should do the right thing, and he does not make a production of it. He simply takes it for granted that he should love his family and his friends, that he should keep his word, and that he should work honestly and to the best of his ability. All these things are easy to say and, as the book makes clear, exceptionally difficult to do. In most cases they grant no reward, in heaven or elsewhere, except the satisfaction of being true to oneself.

One notes, rather to one's surprise, that there are professors of moral philosophy who have something worth saying on this difficult subject. I should read some more Raimond Gaita.

View all 7 comments. Mar 21, notgettingenough rated it it was amazing Shelves: It's a complete mystery why Gaita's two Romulus books are so little read. Perhaps if he'd called them 1 and 2, with the hope for people that there would be a 7 and a I cannot do justice to this book, an elegant but simple, sorrowful but not, self-contained whilst being wide open to the world, recollection of his father.

I guess the general unknown of this outside Australia is a spurning of the edge of the world in part. But most problematic is that people only want to read biography of Im It's a complete mystery why Gaita's two Romulus books are so little read.

But most problematic is that people only want to read biography of Important People. The Importance can be the way of utter triviality, but it has to be public. Romulus, however, isn't Important. He is only important. And apparently that doesn't cut it.

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I'm not going to write about the book, I could not possibly do justice to it, a point on which I have brooded over the past months since reading it. So, to resort to vulgarity, it's a fucking amazing book and anybody who reads it must come out the other end a better person. If enough people read it, at the end the world would be a better world. The Westminster city council has decided that homeless people should find somewhere else to be.

So, as well as declaring that the homeless will no longer make the city their home, the Council has told charities that they aren't allowed to feed the homeless any more. My friend S-L who told me this said that the Council did that to get rid of pigeons, now they are doing it with human beings. Attention Londoners, no feeding the homeless. Lady Di is quickly forgotten. I don't they they would have dared do this if she were alive. After we moved on, Henrietta said how nervous she was, the guy was a drug addict.

He looked like a perfectly ordinary chap to me, but she insisted. If a drug addict wants to rob you, which was her fear, it is only because society for no good reason cripples these people financially. It seems to me a reason to be outraged on their behalf, rather than scared of them. It was a street I travelled up and down daily for six months or so while I was living at one end of it, my PO Box at the other. It is a strip full of crazy people, mostly men, and to begin with I felt as nervous as she did.

Ordinary human beings. Strange to think that we fear people simply because they are powerless, that we somehow invest power into their powerlessness.

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Strange to think we are scared of people because they have nothing and live on the street. So, before long, these were people I knew, not in any intimate way, but in that sense you do people you see every day.

I might add that these people were empathetic. They were quite capable of ignoring you if they felt that is what you wanted. I seem to be scared of making the trip. I come to this point.

In the same week that Romulus, My Father received a literary award, with all the glamour attached to such ceremonies, I read from it at the Sacred Heart Mission, in St. Kilda, reluctantly, for I was aware that people came for lunch, not for literature. At one stage a man, obviously mentally ill, called for me to stop. He raised his head, which he had held in his hands and exclaimed "God is in this book!

His words moved me deeply. I remembered the day when my father and Vacek visited me at school.

That tribute, by a man destitute of all worldly goods and achievements, quite without status or prestige and also quite mad, moved me, gratified me and convinced me of the worth of what I had done more than all the accolades the book has received. I hope you all now understand that you must see this movie, read this book.

And take a walk down Grey St if you can. View all 17 comments. Mar 09, Trevor rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a book that is often studied in the final year of high school here in Australia, written by a philosopher about his dead father — that was all I knew about this book before I started reading it earlier this week. So, I expected it to be quite another kind of book to what it turned out to be. I also really disliked him referring to his chosen pro This is a book that is often studied in the final year of high school here in Australia, written by a philosopher about his dead father — that was all I knew about this book before I started reading it earlier this week.

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This one has always seemed the more urgent to get to, and now I finally have. What surprised me about this was that it was so oppressively about mental illness.

It is told in the kind of matter-of-fact tone that makes the instances of abuse and harm and carelessness that occur due to mental illness seem almost too painful to read. There is lesson here if you are a writer — understatement is the best way to move people, at least, the people most worth moving who should be the people you are writing for in the first place.

This book beautifully displays the way the hurt caused by mental illness can often seem almost banal to those who suffering from the consequences of the madness of those they love. This is a deeply moving book, and mostly in its way of not really trying to be moving at all. It is not something you see or understand first off, you need to live with it for a little while for it to get under your skin.

The land around Maryborough is not beautiful in any conventional way. This book, with so much of it set in Maryborough, is beautiful in much the say way. Sparse, almost desiccated, but also lovely and life affirming in the sense that despite how difficult and patchy life is there, there is something inspiring in getting to see life struggle on anyway. It is the inexorable call to existence. I wonder what young people make of this book — particularly the lines where the author confides he always thought of sexual love as being an infinitely dangerous emotion, that he always feared it as the threat most likely to take away sanity.

There is no question that sons writing about their fathers is an endlessly difficult task, and so, when it is done well it is also one that is directly proportional in fascination to the difficulty of the task. View all 6 comments. Aug 27, Dree rated it liked it. Simple biography of the authors immigrant father.

Sometimes I feel one's appreciation of a novel such as this can be largely due to what time in their life they read it. I didn't find this book as intensely touching as others obviously did but I did enjoy reading it. I expect I would have got more from it had I read it when I was younger. Nevertheless Simple biography of the authors immigrant father. Mar 05, Wayne rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: A brutal book. An absolutely astounding book.

Without a shadow of sentimentality. Which is why it just tears at you. Read it with a valium. I put it on my philosophy shelf too. For this book is all about living an ethical life within the constraints of one's own personality, family and friends, environment, society and the joys and tragedies they bring every day.

When the author, Raimond Gaita, visited the set of the film of his book during its recent production, the young boy playing him, flung himsel A brutal book.

When the author, Raimond Gaita, visited the set of the film of his book during its recent production, the young boy playing him, flung himself on him and hugged him. That's what you will want to do too. See this fine movie, read the better book and lend it out!!!! A European addition to the Australian Experience. I knew Hungarian migrants like this as a very young boy - proud, strong and sensitive people who had drunk deep of the worst Life could offer and just started all over again.

After the Uprising. This book is the genuine article. I consider this to be a masterpiece of biography. Thanks, Wayne, for directing me to it! The writing is spare, simple and direct, philosophically reserved, yet intensely moving. As a tribute to his father, Gaita has done a superb job of educating us all to what it must have been like for a Yugoslav migrant to arrive in Australia and struggle to make a new life in his new land. The writing is so effortless and so beguiling that one almost does not notice how terribly tragic this particular migrant I consider this to be a masterpiece of biography.

The writing is so effortless and so beguiling that one almost does not notice how terribly tragic this particular migrant's family was; yet we are not spared the intensity of the tragedies. The love of the son Raimond Gaita for his new country, and his gradual learning to appreciate and accept the peculiar beauty of the Australian landscape goes hand-in-hand with the tragic elements in his life; all is suffused with an unerring love for his father, an understanding of the difficulties he is going through, and a great respect for his craft, honesty and tenacity.

These two element grow side-by-side, in counterpoint, each making the other more poignant by their juxtaposition. The son views his father, his disturbed and disturbing mother, and the other Yugoslav friends and acquaintances with a certain detachment that grows from the experience of the children of migrants. They are temporarily in a kind of twilight world, where their emotional link to their blood relatives and their friends is almost effortlessly counterbalanced by a growing love for their adopted land never quite shared.

The world of the former is real, but increasingly insignificant, both to Romulus and to Raimond; yet it contains for Raimond the reality of the lost world his parents and their friends inhabit, and something in which he coexisted as a child. All this is so delicately and precisely described, so closely observed, yet so distantly positioned, that the cumulative effect is intensely emotional, and intensely moving; and one is perhaps surprised to realise how very beautiful it all is One learns much, one feels much; one cannot help feeling an understanding of something new about the human condition.

As a paean to compassion, this book is perfect. Sep 05, Lyn Elliott rated it it was amazing Shelves: I saw the film when it came out and thought that I had read the book too. But recently a friend lent me the book and its sequel, After Romulus and I realised I had not read it. Although the film did an excellent job of conveying the main story, the book is essential reading, a tour de force. Raymond Gaita writes simply, with apparent calm, of his parents; his life as a child with his Romanian-Yugoslav father on a desolate farm in rural Victoria; the mental illness of all the adults close to him a I saw the film when it came out and thought that I had read the book too.

Raymond Gaita writes simply, with apparent calm, of his parents; his life as a child with his Romanian-Yugoslav father on a desolate farm in rural Victoria; the mental illness of all the adults close to him and especially that of his mother, the beautiful Christina, who committed suicide after a short, troubled life afflicted with what we would now call manic depression or bipolar disease. Although he had limited formal education, Gaita's father had an acutely developed sense of ethics and morality.

Write a customer review. Read reviews that mention raimond gaita europe lives australian beautifully moving reality illness image. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. As I read this I was thinking of the film, so it was easy to visualise it. But I found the written story rathere tiresome, I'm afraid.

I just loved it. A beautiful ,very emotional family saga. Such strong characters.. Poignant, beautiful. The figurative use of the Australian landscape to explore an inner reality is subtle and expertly rendered. Gaita is up there with Ondaatje. One person found this helpful.

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I found the story interesting and a good read. The hardships of early Australian society, especially for non-Anglo immigrants, were illuminating. Generously and honestly expressed, deep insight into life. Most people have a relative they think has had an interesting life and no doubt Raimond thought his father was interesting too, However the first part of the book was like a schoolboy diary, boring, totally lacking in any feeling or emotion and I couldn't warm to any of the characters.

Raimond hit his straps later and continued to bore me with endless pages of philosophy about nothing. This was a book for our book club and out of 10 people, 3 gave it more than 5 out of 10, 1 person gave it a big fat zero and the rest gave it a panning and a mark less than 5 out of This book is a memoir and a tribute to Romulus Gaita by his son Raimond. Raimond's eulogy for his father was published in Quadrant magazine in , and was then developed into this book.

Who was Romulus Gaita, and why read this memoir? Romulus Gaita was born in Markovac, a village in a Romanian-speaking part of Yugoslavia in At the age of 13, Romulus fled his home in Yugoslavia. The memoir briefly describes Romulus Gaita's early life in Europe, and his arrival in Australia in April as an assisted migrant, together with his wife Christine and their four year old son Raimond.

Romulus Gaita was sent to Baringhup, in central Victoria to work on the construction of a dam on the Loddon River. This is Romulus's story, and while a number of others feature in it especially Christine, Raimond and the Hora brothers it is Romulus who remains in the centre. The stories of the others are really only told as they relate to Romulus. In some ways, Romulus's story has much in common with many other Europeans who immigrated to Australia after the turmoil of World War II.

Assisted migrants were required to work for two years at jobs chosen by the Australian government, jobs that did not always take into account their previous training and skills. Romulus Gaita was a man full of contradictions: But despite these contradictions or perhaps because of them the picture of Romulus Gaita we see is of a man true to his own values, a man intolerant of lies and a man who believed that if you started something you should finish it.

He does not shy away from the difficulties his parents encountered - their tragedies, their episodes of illness, their battles with ignorance as a consequence of difference.

The labour provided was necessary and generally welcomed; the educational, cultural and language differences generally were not. I enjoyed reading this memoir of, tribute to Romulus Gaita.

For all its sadness and tragedy, there is also hope and humour. I have an image of Romulus Gaita, both as an individual and as one of many people who left Europe to build a new life in Australia. Romulus Gaita lived a difficult but fulfilling life. Romulus Gaita was a good man. Jennifer Cameron-Smith. See all 19 reviews. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

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