CHARIOTS OF THE GODS UNSOLVED MYSTERIES OF THE PAST EBOOK FREE DOWNLOAD

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CHARIOTS. OFTHE 9 - Mysteries of South America and other Oddities. 10 - The Earth's cemented down, scholars will call it nonsense and put it on the Index of those behind us. The past teemed with unknown gods who visited the . free from germs. although it is still an unsolved puzzle in what language he could. Unsolved mysteries of the past [Erich von Däniken] on bvifacts.info *FREE* Chariots of the Gods: 50th Anniversary Edition and millions of other books are available for instant access. view Kindle eBook | view Audible audiobook. Enter your . a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App. Chariots of the Gods Mass Market Paperback – June 15, He published his first (and best-known) book, Chariots of the Gods, in Von Däniken's ideas have been the inspiration for a wide range of TV series, including the History Channel's hit Ancient Aliens.


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Results 1 - 24 of 31 Shop amongst 31 popular books, including Chariots Of The Gods, Chariots Free shipping on books over $25! Kobo ebook . Available for download Chariots of the Gods: Unsolved Mysteries of the Past by Erich von. Unsolved Mysteries of the Past was published in February as Tracking Down the Mahabharata Nuclear Bomb Passage from "Chariots of the Gods". Erich von Daniken's Chariots of the Gods is a work of monumen. Unsolved Mysteries of the Past (German: Erinnerungen an die Zukunft: Ungelöste Rätsel der.

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In stock online Not available in stores. This world-famous bestseller has withstood the test of time, inspiring countless…. The Gods Never Left Us: In stock online Available in stores. When Chariots of the Gods was published 50 years ago, it began a worldwide change in humanity's view of the cosmos. Impossible Truths: Why do flying machines and astronauts appear….

Evidence Of The Gods: History is Wrong by Erich Von Daniken.

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Erich von Daniken again shows his flair for revealing the truths that his contemporaries have missed. After closely analyzing hundreds of ancient and apparently unrelated texts, he is now ready to proclaim that human history is nothing like the world religions…. Odyssey of the Gods: Now he tackles the history of Greece and again challenges our….

Remnants Of The Gods: Ships within weeks Not available in stores. We live in an age of information. Stone structures erected by master builders,…. The Eyes Of The Sphinx: Erich von…. We Are the Children of the Stars: Kobo ebook.

Available for download Not available in stores. This groundbreaking book from the early s presents scientific evidence to prove that mankind could not have possibly evolved naturally. Binder and Flindt explore the very real possibility that we are direct descendants of ancient starmen who came from other….

Audio Book CD. When Chariots of the Gods was published fifty years ago, it began a worldwide change in humanity's view of the cosmos. In an era of the military space race, Erich von Daniken boldly proclaimed that Earth had been visited by more advanced beings early in our….

Astronaut Gods of the Maya: Find This Item in Store Not sold in stores. Maybe it was a side-effect of my mother's crazy theory, which she narrated to me again and again, that the Pushpaka Vimana in the epic Ramayana was a real aeroplane; and the sights described as Rama, Lakshmana and Sita flew back to Ayodhya from Sri Lanka was really written from first hand accounts.

Well, you must admit it was a really pretty fantasy. Now here was a guy who was apparently presenting "scientific" evidence for the same! I was overjoyed. I devoured the book Because there is very little science in the book, you see. What we have is a book-long rant of a crackpot enthusiast who cannot even get his mythology correct. After some time, even the most gullible reader will feel that this is to borrow from Wodehouse "pure apple-sauce".

Oh well I'll give him three stars for entertaining me. View all 4 comments. Aug 06, David Boyce added it. Coming at this from the background of astrophysics I can see enough misrepresentation of facts, falsities and misconceptions within his description of basic physics to lose trust in the author.

There were some terrible errors in this book. The thing that had me shaking my head in amusement was when the author tried to draw some deep meaning about how these certain temples are connected to the length of the year on Venus and then get that figure wrong. The fact that he really demonstrated a lack of knowledge on the space part is one thing, but I got the distinct impression that he had misunderstood what the past was like.

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Throughout the book he underestimated the ingenuity of the people of the past and tries to create a image of them as being stupid and helpless. One thing to think about is that they could survive without technology and we could not. Who really is the more advanced, them or us? I feel that every grey area, every part of history obscured by the fog of time, is exploited and made to fit somewhere into his sprawling untidy theory.

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Half way through I lost track of what the theory was supposed to be. Throughout the book I noticed that he would insert his theory into conversations about real science and drop in discussion by real scientists and yet not draw the distinction between the established idea and his idea. It was almost as if his idea was taking a credibility piggyback on established science. Ultimately this book is worth reading so that you can observe all the twists, turns and sidesteps the author goes through to try and convince you.

You could look at it as training in how to build a good healthy scepticism. If you read his book and survive, you may well make a good scientist. View all 3 comments. Jun 06, Tony rated it did not like it Shelves: Baseless, factless, and filled with ridiculous presumptions. It's amazing that with arguments to poorly presented that this book seemed to have such an affect on American culture in the early 70's.

It's simply a get-rich-quick scheme from a Swiss ex-con that paid out good. It fed upon people's need to feel that we come from something "out there. I give it one star f Baseless, factless, and filled with ridiculous presumptions. I give it one star for the good laugh you can get out of reading it. Conspiracy theory researchers, rumour mongers. This is pseudo-science and story telling at its very best. This best selling book was probably the water shed moment in the proliferation of conspiracy theories and other pseudo-scientific stuff in the popular literature.

Chariots of The Gods

And one can see why. To be fair, the author does know how to spin a yarn. It is an enjoyable read, fast paced, if you consider it more as a fiction novel and don't take it seriously. But the disturbing fact is the sheer confidence of the author in his most ridiculous and logic- This is pseudo-science and story telling at its very best. But the disturbing fact is the sheer confidence of the author in his most ridiculous and logic-defying assumptions and hypotheses. With a condescending view towards the historians, he goes on blabbering about one misinterpreted archaeological evidence after the other, citing numerous out-of-context mumble-jumble about this Physics principle and that astronomical data with a stunning conviction.

Though you feel sorry for the hapless millions who have actually religiously accepted this book as a treatise on human evolution and birth of civilization. It shows the sheer absence of clear, scientific thought among the masses and the adherence to half-truths, myths and conspiracy theories. As long as that prevails, works like these will keep on attaining best-selling status. Jul 08, Maude rated it it was amazing. I think Chariots of the Gods was a wonderful and very informative book.

Honestly, I have a lot more respect for Erich von Daniken than I do bloats like the so-called "genius" Stephen Hawking. At least Erich traveled to all of these destinations, done hands-on thorough research, and has proof of all of his claims.

What I like most about Erich and his books is that instead of trying to disprove ancient "mythology" quotations are necessary because technically it is not mythology, but very old reli I think Chariots of the Gods was a wonderful and very informative book.

What I like most about Erich and his books is that instead of trying to disprove ancient "mythology" quotations are necessary because technically it is not mythology, but very old religion and events that took place in the ancient world like many researchers seem to do these days, he proves that all of it is very much real. Ask yourself why you may or one tend to disregard his information as rubbish.

In my opinion, I feel that these kinds of things being told to us is just another way to brainwash people into thinking that it's non-existent. People who automatically disregard Daniken because his notions may sound "bizarre" need to do their own research and experience things. Just doing research won't carry one completely to the end of one's journey, but only half way.

One must fully experience and understand what the sacred texts that Daniken speaks of and quotes from in his in his books. It is the equivalent of skimming through a text book that, for instance, says that a particular event in history happened one way while there are many other books that say the event happened differently with each book stating its own either biased or credible theories, while walking away and claiming that you know everything that happened based upon one book and your own opinions.

I proudly give this book a 5 star rating because he dared what most notable scholars wouldn't do- to PROVE the existence of otherworldly and seemingly strange things in all cultures and religions whether it'd be things from the Bible, Bhagavad Gita, Torrah, ancient ruins and scrolls, and so forth.

Mar 17, Nebuchadnezzar rated it did not like it Shelves: I have to clarify my rating here: One star for "scholarship" and five stars for entertainment value. Erich von Daniken's Chariots of the Gods is, of course, one of, if not the, classic works of pseudoarchaeology and UFOlogy.

Von Daniken blithely ignores close to a century of archaeological and anthropological theory so that he can tilt at the windmills of some imagined scientific "establishment. Surely such "primitive" people could never construct such great monuments! Yes, he does even use the term "savages" in a few places. Nearly every sentence in the book contains some error, misrepresentation, or downright howler.

To document all of them would take an entire book and, what do you know, someone bothered to do it. But if you want to read pure, concentrated bullshit, pick up Chariots of the Gods. Sep 10, Herlinda rated it it was amazing. Mar 08, Werner rated it did not like it Recommends it for: In one Goodreads group which some of my friends belong to, they're having a discussion of the ethics of giving a book a one-star rating with no explanatory review; one person likened the practice to a drive-by shooting.

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I could see her point; but in my case, on the rare occasions I've done it, it's been with nonfiction books read in the past that I didn't have leisure to review, but didn't want people who might browse my shelves to think I agreed with or endorsed, just because I'd read them. Thi In one Goodreads group which some of my friends belong to, they're having a discussion of the ethics of giving a book a one-star rating with no explanatory review; one person likened the practice to a drive-by shooting.

This book is a prime example. Von Daniken's thesis which sold a surprising number of books, and has made him a prosperous man is that, from the Old Stone Age down into the ancient Iron Age, Earth was repeatedly visited, on all parts of the globe, by advanced aliens who are responsible for all of mankind's religions, and for virtually all the architectural and scientific achievements of the ancient world.

Every detail of early history and prehistory, and an array of physical artifacts, are interpreted in light of this claim, and these interpretations are then advanced as "evidence" for it. His claims regarding at least two of these "artifacts" were demonstrated, and subsequently admitted by him, to be false; the PBS series Nova unmasked one of them as a deliberate fraud, and he subsequently defended the fraud as an ethically legitimate way of getting people to believe him.

He constantly portrays himself and anyone who believes him uncritically as heroes of free inquiry and bold unfettered thought, while any doubts as to his claims such as the skepicism of the entire scientific community is ascribed to obvious intellectual cowardice and obscurantist conformism.

Von Daniken himself has no scientific or archaeological credentials --the blurb on one edition of this book calls him an "autodidact" in archaeology, which means self-taught, but sounds more impressive in Greek-- but he does have two documented prison terms for fraud and embezzlement under his belt.

Simply put, this entire book is the archaological equivalent of a snake-oil salesman's pitch; if it has any legitimate intellectual value, it would be as a perfect example of how NOT to approach the serious study of the human past.

View all 13 comments. May 30, Hadrian rated it did not like it Shelves: Perhaps the only good thing that has come up from this book is science fiction inspired by it. Horrible distortion of history and misinterpretation of events. A total waste of time. Let me start of by saying that I do not accept this as the truth, however the some of ideas are not as far-fetched as they might seem at first. One reason I love the ancient astronaut theory is because it brings light to all the thing archaeology conveniently "overlooks".

Which is part of the reason I know look at my once favorite fi Let me start of by saying that I do not accept this as the truth, however the some of ideas are not as far-fetched as they might seem at first. Which is part of the reason I know look at my once favorite field of study with a bit of disdain.

I wanted to hear their theories on all the amazing feats accomplished but they chose to give very straightforward answers that while they make it easier to understand don't really seem to fit.

Main stream scientists don't seem to like facing the possibility of things they themselves consider impossible, where as this theory doesn't like to discredit anything truly probable. Daniken had some very interesting theories that make a lot of sense of you look at it from an open mind. Some of them of course are little out there but at least it opens you up to think on such grand scales.

I might pick up a few more of his books in the future. Jan 23, Matt rated it really liked it. I am sure most people will pan this book - unsubstantiated, inaccurate, baseless, ridiculous, blah, blah, blah. The fact of the matter is that the author does not prove that aliens visited Earth at any time in our past, nor does he claim to have proof of it - ever.

Not once in this book does he claim to have such proof, and he repeats that over and over. Anyone who argues otherwise formed their judgments before reading this book. As far as inacuracies, the book was written in the late 's. It I am sure most people will pan this book - unsubstantiated, inaccurate, baseless, ridiculous, blah, blah, blah. It is not fair to bash a work for inacuracies from the viewpoint of the 21st century, Of course there are inacuracies!

Baseless - hardly A great deal of our real history has been occluded by the irrational zealotries of past and maybe not so past religious and politcal authorities - an immeasurable shame. Our picture of our past and even of our present, with such near-sighted and limited technology at our disposal is woefully underdeveloped.

Were we visited by little green men in the past? I don't know if I'd go that far just yet, but I certainly cannot say that it is an impossibility. I think for us to stand here on one infinitely insignificant world among countless billions or trillions in the "known" universe and state "we are it and we are the best" is ridiculous beyond my ability to put into words.

What I do know is that any civilization advanced enough to visit us would be so far beyond us at this point that it is perfectly feasible that they would be able to do so undetected as we already have stealth technologies that evade our own detection to a large degree and we are centuries, if not millenia from deep space travel.

Have they already intermingled with us? Seems far fetched from naked observation, but far less far fetched than the childlike story of Adam and Eve, or just about any other cultural story of creation, which are, one and all, stories to placate minds far more ignorant than any of those alive in the 21st century should be.

Erich Von Daniken

To look at the mysteries of our own past with closed minds is a mistake and the questions raised in this book a book written for the sole purpose of raising the questions, not offering proof of their concrete veracity is a mistake, and it is irresponsible.

Why and how our ancient peoples did things that would be extraordinarily difficult to do even with the advent of 21st century technology is not an unknown to be scoffed at, and we do not even now have the answers. In that, this book holds true even today. View 1 comment. Jun 21, Natalie Wright rated it it was ok Shelves: I'm a fan of the first season of Ancient Aliens and I wanted to read this book because it seems to be the one that started it all.

Perhaps when it first came out, it was ground-breaking and intriguing, so people ignored how poorly it was written. But now that the ancient alien theory has been explored more fully - and made into an entire television series - this book falls flat. I found the writing difficult to read. Not because of large words or the difficulty of the issues. Rather, the prose is s I'm a fan of the first season of Ancient Aliens and I wanted to read this book because it seems to be the one that started it all.

Rather, the prose is so stilted, the editing so horrible, the sentences so run-on, it was hard to plod through. Putting aside the shortcomings of the prose, the book also did not fulfill its promise of showing evidence for aliens having visited Earth in the ancient past. The author would present intriguing mysteries from the historic record and archeological sites, then lead the reader to question it often making extreme assumptions , then drop a bunch of questions.

It's more of a pamphlet that raises questions. The author raises some important and intriguing questions, but I can't recommend that readers pay for a book of questions. When I was young I was convinced that aliens had visited us on many occasions. I have changed the way I think about the facts now, but this book was one of the first books I ever read that made me consider an alternate narrative to mainstream thought Sep 30, Belhor rated it it was ok Shelves: Very fake and very creative.

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